Book review lolita

The author or the character? I wanted to talk to someone about my experience straight away.

Book review lolita

In it, Ray writes that he's presenting the details of a memoir entitled The Confession of a White Book review lolita Male written by a literary scholar of mixed European ethnicity who died recently in an American jail of heart disease while awaiting his murder trial. The memoir's author uses the pseudonym Humbert Humbert to refer to himself in the manuscript.

Humbert begins the memoir with his Parisian childhood and ends it with his incarceration. The story is told entirely from Humbert's perspective. Ray says he received the memoir from Humbert's lawyer, C.

Clark, and adds that he Ray has changed the names of the people mentioned in it to protect their identities except for one: Ray notes that Lolita died in while giving birth to a stillborn girl on Christmas Day while married to Richard Schiller, presumably the father of her child.

After losing his mother at a young age, Humbert has a rich childhood living in his wealthy father's hotel. At the age of 13 Humbert has a precocious relationship with a girl his age, Annabel Leigh, but her family moves away before they get the chance to have full sex.

Annabel dies shortly thereafter of typhus. Following this, Humbert finds he has a hebephilic fixation with certain girls ages 9 to 14 which he identifies as nymphetsciting his encounter with Annabel as the cause.

Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov

Humbert visits many prostitutes as a young adult but is unsatisfied unless they resemble a nymphet. He eventually marries a Polish woman named Valeria to allay suspicion of his hebephilia.

Humbert plans on migrating to America and leaving her after several years of marriage, only for the marriage to dissolve anyway after she admits to having an affair.

Later, Humbert suffers a mental breakdown and recovers in a psychiatric hospital. Upon his release, he moves to the United States to write, living off an allowance left by a wealthy uncle in return for writing perfume adverts.

After a year attached to an arctic expedition, the only time in his life he claims to have been free of his tortured yearning, Humbert suffers another mental breakdown, and learns to manipulate psychiatrists while he recovers.

Relieved of his perfume duties while still entitled to the allowance, Humbert plans to move to South America to take advantage of looser laws concerning the age of consent. However he's offered to board and lodge with the McCoo family, living in the fictional New England town of Ramsdale, and he accepts purely because they have a 12 year-old daughter whom he plans to spy on.

Upon his arrival he discovers that their house has burned down; Charlotte Haze, a wealthy Ramsdale widow, offers to accommodate him instead and Humbert visits her residence out of politeness. He initially plans to decline Charlotte's offer but agrees to rent when he sees her year-old daughter, Dolores, whom Charlotte calls Lo.

Charlotte and Dolores have a poisonous relationship and frequently argue, while Humbert finds himself growing infatuated with Dolores and privately nicknames her Lolita. Over the course of a single month Humbert's entire life comes to revolve around masturbating to Lolita.

He starts a diary in which he records his obsessive fantasies about Dolores, while also expressing his loathing for Charlotte whom he sees as an obstacle to his passion. One Sunday morning, while Charlotte is out of the house, Dolores and Humbert engage in a somewhat flirtatious interaction, ending with Lolita sitting on Humbert's knee.

Humbert uses the interaction to bring himself to ejaculate, which Dolores does not apparently notice. Charlotte decides to send Dolores to summer camp, where she will stay for three weeks.

On the day of leaving, Lolita runs back upstairs and kisses Humbert on the lips, before returning to the car.

Book review lolita

The housemaid gives Humbert a letter from Charlotte shortly thereafter, in which she confesses that she has fallen in love with him. She adds that if he doesn't love her back he must move out immediately. Humbert's solution to this dilemma is to marry Charlotte, for purely instrumental reasons — it will let him stay close to Dolores and even let him innocently fondle her out of feigned paternalism.

Later, Charlotte voices her plan to send Dolores to a boarding school when she returns from camp.

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Humbert contemplates murdering Charlotte to remain close to Dolores, and even comes close to drowning her in the town lake, but stops before carrying it out. Humbert instead acquires strong sedatives from the town doctor, planning to put both Hazes to sleep so that he can molest Dolores in the night.

A few days later however, Charlotte finds Humbert's diary and furiously confronts him, telling him he will never see Dolores again. While Humbert prepares a drink for her, Charlotte runs out of the house to mail letters she's written to friends about Humbert's lust for Dolores, but is killed by a swerving car.

Humbert recovers the letters from the accident scene and destroys them. Later, he convinces Charlotte's friends and neighbors that he should look after Dolores as he is now her stepfather.

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Humbert retrieves Dolores from camp and lies to her, telling her that Charlotte is ill and has been hospitalized. He then takes her to a high-end hotel that Charlotte had earlier recommended.

Humbert feels guilty about consciously raping her, and so tricks her into taking the sedatives in her ice cream. As he waits for the pill to take effect he wanders through the hotel and meets an anonymous man who, unbeknownst to Humbert, is in fact famous playwright Clare Quilty, a friend of the now-deceased Charlotte.

Quilty recognises Dolores, and without revealing anything talks ambiguously to Humbert about his "daughter". Humbert excuses himself from the conversation and returns to the hotel room.

There, he discovers that the doctor fobbed him with a milder drug, as Dolores is merely drowsy and wakes up frequently, drifting in and out of sleep.This book may appeal more to teens who are into the "Gothic Lolita" style and culture than those who just happen upon this book.

Book review lolita

While it has some universal themes of love and the human connection, the author tries too hard to make a simple plot complex. Weinman begins her book with the clue that, like Poe's purloined letter, Nabokov planted in plain sight.

Toward the end of Lolita, Humbert asks himself in a quick aside, "Had I done to Dolly. Jul 07,  · The collection was named a book of the year by The Independent of London and The Irish Times, and he's received the Southern Review's annual short fiction award and a .

Dark novel tries too hard to be deep and complicated. Read Common Sense Media's Gothic Lolita review, age rating, and parents guide. out of 5 stars Review Lolita? This is kind of like reviewing Canterbury Tales or The Hunchback of Notre Dame. The legend precedes the book and outruns any leslutinsduphoenix.coms: K.

Lolita the book is excellent and everyone knows what it is about. Methinks the only thing one can review are the annotations. I got a lot out of them. Nabokov isn't the type to explain what he's doing so the notes are very useful.

There are a lot of foreign phrases and references to literature and even connections between material early and.

Book review: Was Lolita inspired by a true crime? Sarah Weinman argues so | leslutinsduphoenix.com