Actg 352 case

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Actg 352 case

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Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Complex

For assistance, please send e-mail to: Type Accommodation and the title of the report in the subject line of e-mail. An erratum has been published for this Actg 352 case. To view the erratum, please click here. Purpose The recommendations in this document are intended to guide the treatment of tuberculosis Actg 352 case settings where mycobacterial cultures, drug susceptibility testing, radiographic facilities, and second-line drugs are routinely available.

In areas where these resources are not available, the recommendations provided by the World Health Organization, the International Union against Tuberculosis, or national tuberculosis control programs should be followed.

It is strongly recommended that the initial treatment strategy utilize patient-centered case management with an adherence plan that emphasizes direct observation of therapy.

Recommended treatment regimens are rated according to the strength of the evidence supporting their use.

Actg 352 case

Where possible, other interventions are also rated. Emphasis is placed on the importance of obtaining sputum cultures at the time of completion of the initial phase of treatment in order to identify patients at increased risk of relapse.

Extended treatment is recommended for patients with drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis who have cavitation noted on the initial chest film and who have positive sputum cultures at the time 2 months of treatment is completed.

The roles of rifabutin, rifapentine, and the fluoroquinolones are discussed and a regimen with rifapentine in a once-a-week continuation phase for selected patients is described. Practical aspects of therapy, including drug administration, use of fixed-dose combination preparations, monitoring and management of adverse effects, and drug interactions are discussed.

Treatment completion is defined by number of doses ingested, as well as the duration of treatment administration. Special treatment situations, including human immunodeficiency virus infection, tuberculosis in children, extrapulmonary tuberculosis, culture-negative tuberculosis, pregnancy and breastfeeding, hepatic disease and renal disease are discussed in detail.

The management of tuberculosis caused by drug-resistant organisms is updated. The current status of research to improve treatment is reviewed. Summary Responsibility for Successful Treatment The overall goals for treatment of tuberculosis are 1 to cure the individual patient, and 2 to minimize the transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to other persons.

Thus, successful treatment of tuberculosis has benefits both for the individual patient and the community in which the patient resides. Prescribing physician responsibility for treatment completion is a fundamental principle in tuberculosis control.

However, given a clear understanding of roles and responsibilities, oversight of treatment may be shared between a public health program and a private physician. Organization and Supervision of Treatment Treatment of patients with tuberculosis is most successful within a comprehensive framework that addresses both clinical and social issues of relevance to the patient.

Patients may be managed in the private sector, by public health departments, or jointly, but in all cases the health department is ultimately responsible for ensuring that adequate, appropriate diagnostic and treatment services are available, and for monitoring the results of therapy.

It is strongly recommended that patient-centered care be the initial management strategy, regardless of the source of supervision. This strategy should always include an adherence plan that emphasizes directly observed therapy DOTin which patients are observed to ingest each dose of antituberculosis medications, to maximize the likelihood of completion of therapy.

Programs utilizing DOT as the central element in a comprehensive, patient-centered approach to case management enhanced DOT have higher rates of treatment completion than less intensive strategies.

Such measures may include, for example, social service support, treatment incentives and enablers, housing assistance, referral for treatment of substance abuse, and coordination of tuberculosis services with those of other providers.

There are four recommended regimens for treating patients with tuberculosis caused by drug-susceptible organisms. Although these regimens are broadly applicable, there are modifications that should be made under specified circumstances, described subsequently. Each regimen has an initial phase of 2 months followed by a choice of several options for the continuation phase of either 4 or 7 months.

The recommended regimens together with the number of doses specified by the regimen are described in Table 2. The initial phases are denoted by a number 1, 2, 3, or 4 and the continuation phases that relate to the initial phase are denoted by the number plus a letter designation a, b, or c.

Drug doses are shown in Tables 34and 5.ACTG Columbia On-Line Networks Case Due: Wednesday, January 22 (at the beginning of class). Also, please be prepared to discuss the case and your solution in class on this date. Read this essay on Actg Case 2.

C Karapetis - Flinders University

Come browse our large digital warehouse of free sample essays. Get the knowledge you need in order to pass your classes and more. Only at leslutinsduphoenix.com". This course concentrates specifically on protein synthesis inhibitors which consist of many different pharmacologic categories with their respective therapeutic agents.

This course concentrates specifically on protein synthesis inhibitors which consist of many different pharmacologic categories with their respective therapeutic agents. Treatment of Tuberculosis American Thoracic Society, CDC, and Infectious Diseases Society of America.

Please note: An erratum has been published for this article. To view the erratum, please click here.. This Official Joint Statement of the American Thoracic Society, CDC, and the Infectious Diseases Society of America was approved by the ATS Board of Directors, by CDC, and by the Council of.

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S.

Actg 352 case

Federal Government.

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